10 Myths about Fleet Management (Part 2)

10-Myths-about-Fleet-Management-2

Read the first part of the article here.

Replacements can’t benefit from an extended policy without some sort of financial penalty

Replacements can’t benefit from an extended policy without some sort of financial penalty

Many people, both within and outside of the fleet management profession, presume that extending a policy’s lifetime results in vehicles that become increasingly expensive, requiring part and components replacements. However whilst such situations demand extensive analysis, this is far from applicable in all instances.

To this end replacement roles should form part of the cost reduction review and should be coupled with a complete preventive maintenance program.

Fleet management consists of car enthusiasts who just happen to work as a fleet manager

Fleet managers are often mistook for greased up mechanics and car enthusiasts. It seems that, for whatever reason, many take the fleet management business as one based upon car mechanics rather than the careful tracking and analysis of new and used vehicle markets: which are, after all, two completely different industries.

Fleet management consists of car enthusiasts who just happen to work as a fleet manager
Fleet management consists of car enthusiasts who just happen to work as a fleet manager

Strategic sourcing means that the fleet manager is completely outside of the decision making process

A recent misunderstanding that has developed is that source professionals can undertake their jobs without the input of a fleet manager.  However just because there exists sourcing within the fleet RFP process doesn’t and shouldn’t mean that the need for solid fleet management is ignored.

Fleet management is today completely different from the fleet management of yesterday

This myth has been a matter of heated debate over the years, however when all is said and done the role of the fleet manager still requires a determination of what vehicles should be used for what roles, as well as a consideration of the driver’s safety; this basic remit has not changed over the years and fleet managers today are still required to develop, implement and update a policy that fits the fleet accordingly.

Fleet management is today completely different from the fleet management of yesterday
The fleet management professional is slowly dying out with outsourcing filling their spaces

The fleet management professional is slowly dying out with outsourcing filling their spaces

Today companies are increasingly choosing to outsource certain aspects of the fleet manager’s role, however this is far from the position itself being outsourced.

There will always be a need for an in-house fleet manager and where companies have attempted to outsource the role there has been a realisation that companies and individuals outside of the company rarely understand the fleet, the company’s needs or have a grasp upon the business’s resources.